Oh how I dislike ice dams

This comes from personal experience of course.  Two years ago, during the midst of a winter way worse then this my home had an ice dam.  Here is a link to some great tips on helping prevent them, bye bye ice dam ?

Basically it is times like this, cold weather then warmer weather then more snow then some rain that are prime conditions for ice dams developing.  Now although my claims experience was very good having the wall and ceiling of your kitchen opened up is not fun.  Not being able to find the exact cause of where it comes in from is not fun.  Crawling on a roof in the winter is definitely not fun or safe.  So what can you do?

Is this a claim?

So about an hour ago this tree came down and I am sure many more have come down and will come down up and down the east coast.  So now what?

  1. Make sure everyone is ok.  In this case no people were near by
  2. Take a photo ALWAYS document damage BEFORE you clean up **It is ok to wait till the storm is over but do your best to limit damage***
  3. Get an estimate or do the work yourself    ***BE CAREFUL*** When storms occur unscrupulous gougers and amateurs come with them.

Hurricane of claims coming? Get prepared..

So as this is typed a hurricane is affecting North Carolina up to Northern New Jersey.  With this storm as in any other there will likely be lots of claims filed. So what can you do?  Well take a deep breath and realize that ALL companies have done everything they can to mobilize their claim units and it still may not be enough.  Please try and be patient and instead try doing some of the following things, these are some ideas I have developed and used over the last ten years that work.

How to take control of your claim

Step 1.Remember why you have insurance, it is not for the little annoying thing that you can comfortably afford to fix.  It is for the event that you need help paying to fix.  Filing a claim because  “I pay for insurance why shouldn’t I use it…” can get you in to trouble. **What is trouble?  Trouble is having rates on the higher side of the market for at least three years**